Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

New pay service creates online gaming arena

GameSpot, one of the most popular Web sites for video game enthusiasts, has started a new subscription online service where hard-core gamers can battle each other in the most popular online computer games.

Dubbed a ``premium gaming service,'' GameSpot Game Center will offer $9.99-a-month subscriptions to gamers who will be able to play at the highest speed connections in online games such as Electronic Arts' ``Battlefield 2.'' It will offer discussion groups, voice chat services and tournaments as well. GameSpot is owned by online portal CNet Networks.

The object is to create a cool gaming experience with fast game play and connections with like-minded gamers.

Services like this have failed in the past, but largely because they involved spending a lot of money on computer servers. GameSpot has found a way to reduce that expense by leasing them from a third party.

It remains to be seen if gamers will pay to play online games that they can play for free via the Internet. But GameCenter product manager Sam Parker says GameCenter removes a lot of the hassles from online gaming.

GameCenter will allow players to host their own online games. That means it will allow them to configure a Battlefield 2 game and customize it to their tastes so that as many as 64 players can fight it out without annoying hiccups in broadband service that slow down a game and make it all but impossible to play.

Full Story.

gamespot's gamecenter.

More in Tux Machines

Project Halium Seeks A Unified Mobile GNU/Linux

New forks of GNU/Linux come out all the time, but some, like the newly unveiled Project Halium, actively seek to unite a given landscape. In this case the mobile world. Rather than being yet another version of Linux on mobile devices, like SailfishOS or Ubuntu Touch, Project Halium’s goal is to create a base that anybody can work off of to integrate all sorts of Linux code into the Android stack smoothly. Ideally, Project Halium wants to not only build out a base framework that anybody can use to hook their Linux project into Android’s soft underbelly of code and run it on an Android device, but they want to be the de facto example of such, in much the same way that saying the word “Linux” out in public will make many people immediately think of Ubuntu. Read more

3 Linux questions from the community

In the last The Queue, I flipped the script and asked you questions as opposed to answering them. It was so well received, I'm going to keep it going with three more questions this month. I'll resume answering next month, so don't forget you can fill the queue with your questions about Linux, building and maintaining communities, contributing to an open source project, and anything else you'd like to know. While the previous two questions were a bit philosophical, this month we'll keep it fun. Read more

Flatpak 0.9.3 Linux App Sandboxing Framework Released with Many Builder Changes

Alex Larsson from the Flatpak team announces the release and immediate availability of the third maintenance update to the Flatpak 0.9 series of the open-source Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework. Read more

New CloudLinux 7 Beta Linux Kernel Available for Testing, Two Crashes Addressed

CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi announced today, April 26, 2017, the availability of a new Beta kernel for users of the CloudLinux 7 operating system series, addressing various vulnerabilities discovered lately. Read more