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Extending Nautilus context menus with Nautilus-actions

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Software

There are literally dozens of plugins and extensions for Nautilus, the default file manager on the GNOME desktop environment, but there is just one that allows you to customize the Nautilus context menu items. The Nautilus-actions extension enables you to add customized entries to the context menu such that, when you right-click a file, the context menu will show options specific to that file.

Ubuntu and Fedora users can use apt-get and yum respectively to install Nautilus-actions. The nautilus-image-converter and nautilus-open-terminal extensions we discussed recently were both created using the Nautilus-actions extension, so let's see how Nautilus-actions works.

On my Fedora 7 machine, the Nautilus Actions Configuration tool is available under System -> Preferences -> Look and Feel -> Nautilus Actions Configuration. This tool allows you to create new context menu items. To create a new action (context menu item), click the Add button.

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