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Open-Source Database Technologies Flourish

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OSS

Microsoft can snipe all it wants at the TCO and security of open source, but a flood of database-, BI- and data-center-related news coming out of LinuxWorld means one thing: Linux has drilled so far down into overall IT frameworks that it's simply another option on the short list.

Commercialization of open source is one trend evident at LinuxWorld Conference & Expo, and it's being reflected big-time in database-centric offerings.

"We're seeing the notion that open-source products have a very, very viable business model and have established themselves as credible players," said Steve O'Grady, an analyst at Redmond.

"While they don't play in exactly the same markets and don't compete feature-to-feature with proprietary [solutions], there's a sizable market that's not interested in all the bells and whistles included with proprietary vendors."

Acceptance of the commercial open-source model is more evident than ever. The database is, and will always be, a critical component of the application stack, O'Grady said. And as LinuxWorld shows, options for that stack are viable and vibrant.

Partnerships discussed at LinuxWorld are a good indication of that. For example, Dell Inc.'s announcement on Monday that it would resell MySQL AB's open-source database, along with the other components of the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP/Python/Perl) stack, are both an indication of the widening spread of the stack and of this enormously popular database.

O'Grady said that such a big-volume play means that MySQL is going to get a crack at entering enterprises up and down the scale.

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