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Reiser trial delayed by National TV show

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Reiser

Opening statements in the trial of computer science engineer Hans Reiser on charges he murdered his wife, Nina Reiser, have been delayed by at least a week because of concerns about potential prejudicial information in an upcoming national television show about his case.

Reiser's attorney, William DuBois, said today another reason for the delay is that Alameda County Juvenile Court officials refused to turn over the file of the custody case involving the Reisers' children, 8-year-old Rory and 6-year-old Nio.

DuBois said Juvenile Court officials turned down repeated requests for the file from prosecutor Paul Hora but finally agreed to hand it over today after Superior Court Judge Larry Goodman, who is presiding over Reiser's trial, asked them to comply.

Opening statements had been scheduled to be presented next Monday but now have tentatively been set for Nov. 5, three days after the high- profile case is to be featured on ABC TV's 20/20 program on Nov. 2, which is the beginning of sweeps month, a period when networks try to increase their viewership so they can boost their ad rates.

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