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GIMP 2.4.0 Officially Released

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GIMP

GIMP 2.4.0 is released and celebrated with a new look for gimp.org. Developers, artists and user interface designers from all over the world worked together to make GIMP more powerful and easier to use than ever.

To celebrate the release of GIMP 2.4, we have refreshed the web site. We hope that you like the new design done by Jimmac and that you will find your way around the new and old content.

General Improvements include:

Refreshed Look
A whole new default icon theme has been created for 2.4. The icons comply with the Tango style guidelines so GIMP doesn't feel out of place on any of the supported platforms. Regardless of whether you run GIMP under Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X or Linux (GNOME, KDE or Xfce), GIMP provides a polished, consistent look.

Scalable Brushes
Scalable BrushesThe tool options now include a brush size slider that affects both the parametric and bitmap brushes. This has been an oft-requested feature from both digital painters and photo editors.

Selection Tools
Selection ToolsThe selection tools have been rewritten from scratch to allow resizing of existing selections. Additionally the rectangular selection tool includes a setting for creating rounded corners as this has been identified as a very common task among web designers.

Foreground Select Tool
Selecting individual objects on images is easier now with a new foreground select tool.

Align Tool
Te new Align Tool allows you to align or distribute a list of layers, paths or guides. You can align these objects with another object, with the selection or with the image.

Changes in menus
Most notable is the new top-level Color menu that accumulates most tools, plug-ins and scripts that adjust colors in RGB/Grayscale mode and color palettes in Indexed mode.

Digital Photography

Fullscreen Editing
The fullscreen mode has been improved to not only allow getting a full scale preview of the artwork, but also allow comfortable editing. The artist has maximum screen estate available while all functionality is quickly accessible by pressing the Tab key (toggles visibility of all docks) when working fullscreen.

More on new features at the Release Notes

Get yours or see the new site at gimp.org




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