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Slashdot Turns Ten

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News

* Home of community-driven content celebrates 10 years of tech news
* More than 80,000 stories posted over the past decade

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., Oct. 24, 2007 -- Slashdot (http://
slashdot.org), part of SourceForge, Inc. (Nasdaq:LNUX), the web site
that pioneered community-generated content, will celebrate its tenth
anniversary on October 25, 2007. To celebrate the anniversary,
Slashdot is hosting a free event at Palo Alto's Blue Chalk Bistro,
where members of the community can meet the site's founders and
editorial team.

The tech community news site, started in 1997 by Rob "CmdrTaco" Malda
with Jeff "Hemos" Bates, has grown to an Internet phenomenon in its
10 year run. Slashdot features stories submitted by readers and
posted by a dedicated Slashdot editorial board. The site serves as a
water cooler for a generation of technophiles and established the
model for today's changing media landscape. In August 2007, Slashdot
launched a new feature called Firehose that allows subscribers a
glimpse into the submission process normally only seen by Slashdot's
editors.

"Nobody's more surprised than I am that we've reached the ten year
mark," said Rob Malda, Slashdot co-founder. "But we saw what people
wanted, and gave it to them before anyone else did."

Stories on the site range from technical to bizarre, falling under
the site's trademarked motto News for Nerds. Stuff that Matters.
Slashdot's popularity regularly overpowers its featured websites,
causing many to experience the "Slashdot effect," where the
unexpected and overwhelming traffic slows or temporarily shuts down
the linked-to site.

Malda has been posting insights and highlights on Slashdot's origins
throughout the month on the site, including:

Links to the navel-gazing brief history of Slashdot:
http://meta.slashdot.org/meta/07/10/02/1553218.shtml

http://meta.slashdot.org/meta/07/10/10/1445216.shtml

http://meta.slashdot.org/meta/07/10/17/1412245.shtml

Most bizarre story broken on Slashdot:
http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=02/02/14/143254

Top most visited stories and most active stories on Slashdot:
http://slashdot.org/hof.shtml

Photos of CmdrTaco and Hemos:
http://cmdrtaco.net/rob.shtml

http://web.sourceforge.com/company/mgmt_jeff_bates.php

About SourceForge, Inc.

SourceForge's media and e-commerce web sites connect millions of
influential technology professionals and enthusiasts each day.
Combining user-developed content, online marketplaces and e-commerce,
SourceForge is the global technology community's nexus for
information exchange, goods for geeks, and open source software
distribution and services. SourceForge's network of web sites serves
more than 32 million unique visitors each month* and includes:
SourceForge.net, Slashdot, ThinkGeek, Linux.com, freshmeat.net,
ITManagersJournal and NewsForge. For more information or to view the
media kit online, visit www.sourceforge.com. (*Source: Google
Analytics and Omniture, July 2007.)

SourceForge, SourceForge.net, Slashdot, freshmeat, and ThinkGeek are
registered trademarks of SourceForge, Inc. in the United States and
other countries. All other trademarks or product names are property
of their respective owners.

CONTACT: Page One PR
Mike Maney
+1.215.345.7096
mike@pageonepr.com

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