Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ahhh! What did they do to my Gimp?

Filed under
GIMP

I've just installed Mandriva One 2008 on my kid's computer. Ordinarily, I'd be reviewing that first. But the first thing I do with a distro review is pop open Gimp to take screenshots. And Mandriva's using the release candidate Gimp 2.4. And I opened it and with a tortured shriek that sent birds flying from every tree on the block, uttered the line which makes the title of this post.

I have good news and bad news: the good news is that a ton of new features have been added. The bad news is, the UI has been entirely re-designed. Have you ever used the Gimp before, read a Gimp tutorial online, been using it since the 1.0 days? Then you will be lost. I repeat, you will be lost. You might as well go pick a new graphics tool to learn as the Gimp. For instance, where were drop shadows? Script-Fu->Shadow->Drop Shadow? No, as the above screenshot shows, it's now in Filters->Light and Shadow->Drop Shadows. And the old light menu now has shadow stuff dumped in on top of it. And there simply is no script-fu menu any more... presumably, there won't be a Python-fu menu any more either.

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Second Alpha Build of Liquid Lemur Linux 2.0 Brings LibreOffice 5, Based on Debian 8

Edward Snyder, the creator and maintainer of the Debian-based Liquid Lemur Linux distribution, has announced the release and immediate availability for download of the second Alpha build of the upcoming Liquid Lemur Linux 2.0 distro. Read more

Manjaro Linux 0.8.13.1 Fluxbox Edition Gets Linux Kernel 4.1 LTS, Download Now

The Manjaro Linux team, through Bernhard Landauer, has proudly announced the release of an updated version of the Manjaro Linux Fluxbox Edition, namely 0.8.13.1, which features an updated Linux kernel and numerous improvements. Read more

NVIDIA reveals GPUs for blade servers, Linux desktop support

VMworld 2015 NVIDIA has announced the second version of its Grid desktop virtualisation software, complete with a pair of GPUs for blade servers. NVIDIA is pitching GRID as a hardware offering tuned to the needs of graphically-demanding desktop virtualisation (VDI) workloads. If that sounds a bit exotic, consider environments like the resources industry, where on-site engineers need CAD and modelling tools, but miners are loathe to deploy desktops in the remote sites where stuff gets dug out of the ground. VDI works a treat in such spots. Read more

GNU Linux-libre 4.2-gnu is now available

Many new drivers required cleaning of their blob-requesting-and-loading machinery. Various others needed deblobbing updates due to blob name changes and false positives. Read more Also: