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HP's Fink Speaks at Linuxworld

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Linux

Hewlett-Packard’s Martin Fink challenges IBM and Sun to drop their open source licensing schemes and adopt the GPL. "Intel was the first to openly and proactively deprecate the open source license they had created. I was going to issue a challenge—or rather ask IBM to follow Intel’s lead and deprecate IBM’s open source license and put it under the GPL. I will give Sam Palmisano, Nick Donofrio and Irving Wladawksy-Berger a brand-new HP laptop preloaded with Linux. I also want to ask Scott McNealy and Jonathan Schwartz to deprecate the CDDL and run under the GPL." He also offered the two Sun executives an HP laptop, but preloaded with Windows, for a laugh.

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NonStop servers, four-processor modules that can be interconnected to form gargantuan configurations, run demanding tasks such as the Nasdaq trading system. Today, they use an exotic operating system called the NonStop Kernel, but HP has begun moving the product line closer to the mainstream by adopting Intel's relatively mainstream Itanium processors earlier this year.

Now HP is seeing if the software can be made more mainstream as well, though it hasn't committed to swapping out the existing operating system. Martin Fink, head of HP's Open Source and Linux Organization and as of May its NonStop Enterprise Division as well, announced the Linux move at the LinuxWorld Conference and Expo on Tuesday.

"We're going to donate a collection of NonStop servers to premier universities around the world," Fink said. "With the help of (these) universities, we will be able to see interesting new capabilities in the Linux kernel and the Linux you use every day."

HP also announced it has moved 200 open-source packages to the NonStop line. By the end of this year, that number should reach 500, Fink said.

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