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Novell might never get a penny from SCO

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SUSE

emember when SCO used to be known as a big fish in the Unix OS pond, well respected and pretty much a pillar in this particular vendor community? No, neither do I. The image of a company that sought to claim IBM had somehow inappropriately contributed to Linux development, a bizarre tactical strategy to leverage some kind of financial settlement from Big Blue if you listen to many industry analysts, is the one that pops into my head every time I see the letters S, C and O now.

Currently under Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, SCO would seem to be set to bail out of the Unix business altogether if filings published at Groklaw are anything to go by. The snazzy named motion reveals that JGD Management Corp. (d/b/a York Capital Management) has made an offer to buy certain of its Unix assets for a total of $36 million.

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