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The Hidden Costs of Dual-Core Processors

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Hardware

Computer makers are beginning to ship servers and desktop PCs with dual-core processors that promise to benefit high-performance systems and eventually impact mainstream desktop PCs.

However, enterprise managers are wondering whether there are any potential hidden costs involving the use of dual-core processors. In particular, questions have emerged about power consumption, heat dissipation and software licensing, for example.

Despite such questions, one thing is certain: The industry is moving toward the universal deployment of multicore-processor technology. "It's not like there's an option to stick to single-core, even in the near-term," said Illuminata senior analyst Gordon Haff.

Moore's Law Revisited

The adoption of dual-core computing will be driven by the need to expand beyond the present limitations associated with existing single-core processors.

Dual-Core Design Savings

The goal of the new technology is to achieve greater efficiency as well as performance speed.
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"Dual-core and multicore technology is designed to improve system efficiency and application performance for computers running multiple applications, as well as enable customers to get more CPU horsepower in a smaller footprint."

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