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The Battle For Wesnoth

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Gaming

The Battle for Wesnoth is not your typical run-of-the-mill TBS game. The genre turn-based strategy, or TBS, is very self-explanatory. It is, simply put, a game where-as the game flow is broken down into turns or rounds and the game plays from there on.

Although there are many other fantasy-themed titles floating around the Internet, this one does stand out of the crowd with its many intriguing features. For starters, the game offers nearly 200 forms of units along with 16 variations of races and six factions to choose from. The game allows the users to become creative and embark on their own personalized journeys. From conceiving your own units and characters to forging the worlds you dream of being in, the Battle for Wesnoth is a must-have download for any gamer out there.

For those whom are into high-resolution 3D visuals containing soft particles and such, this game is probably not for you. Although, the graphics on this game are astounding for the style of which they are made in, this is a 2-dimensional pixel-based masterpiece. You will find that the simplicity of the graphics make them very fulfilling. The form of art is very innovative and is not your typical RPG. Although some aspects of the game are derivatives of your standard RPG they are necessary in the sense in that it's what many people think of when they imagine fantasy games. I for one know that I do not want to see an old and frail man as my leading legendary hero whom shall defeat the leaching hordes of doom. The graphics style of the environment is also very clean. They're simple and gets the job done and yet detailed and invokes the mind to join in on the adventure.

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