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Ubuntu 7.10 Gibbon swings on the Asus Eee

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Ubuntu

The Gibbonfest continues. We've just had an Asus Eee in to look at - the £220 laptop that everyone who's seen it is going to buy. It's one of the hottest things in the office this year: the combination of the insanely low price tag, the perfectly functional specification (512MB RAM, 4GB internal flash SSD, wi-fi, real keyboard, VGA display) and its extreme portability makes it an instant hit.

However, we inherited the Eee from another reviewer, who had accidentally nuked the Xandros Linux OS with which it had been supplied. To spare his blushes, I'll let him remain anonymous for the next three words - but it was Rory Reid from cnet.co.uk - and I won't reveal he'd then bodged an XP install to leave things in quite a challenging state.

Since we couldn't find the binaries to reinstall the Asus custom version of Xandros, and had Ubuntu 7.10 CDs sitting around, we thought we'd give the Gibbon another spin.

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