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Mobile Spam: The Next Battleground?

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Security

According to joint study conducted by Intrado, Switzerland's University of St. Gallen and the International Telecommunicaton Union, more than 80 percent of Europe's mobile-phone Latest News about mobile phones users received at least one unwanted spam message cloaked as a short messaging service (SMS) transmission during 2004.

Moreover, the results indicate that 83 percent of all mobile users responding to the survey expect mobile spam to become a critical issue for them within the next one to two years.

Although the U.S. lags far behind Europe with respect to the prevalence of SMS technology, at least 75 percent of the mobile phones used in North America today are SMS-capable. This percentage will rise to 100 percent by the end of 2006, predicts IDC senior research analyst Lewis Ward. In addition, by the end of 2005 there will be 65 million subscribers to SMS services, or 36 percent of all wireless Latest News about wireless subscribers, Ward said.

Given the technology's increasing traction in the U.S. mobile marketplace, is it likely that North America will become the next big battleground for mobile spam? The short answer is "no," said Jim Manis, the global chairman of the Mobile Marketing Association (MMA).

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