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Commandline Interface

Perhaps a better question...

If you're using this as a measure of relative user sophistication, then perhaps a better question is how many have written their own scripts (in shell language, python, ruby, perl, or lua or whatever) to help with system administration or automating common repetitive tasks?

After all, even the rawest Ubuntu newbie user uses the cli to install (mostly the non-free) stuff.

For my own combination of desktop use and server administration, I'm somewhere between "every day" and "once in a while", but closer to "every day".

Not very sophisticated.

gfranken wrote:
If you're using this as a measure of relative user sophistication, then perhaps a better question is how many have written their own scripts (in shell language, python, ruby, perl, or lua or whatever) to help with system administration or automating common repetitive tasks?

After all, even the rawest Ubuntu newbie user uses the cli to install (mostly the non-free) stuff.

For my own combination of desktop use and server administration, I'm somewhere between "every day" and "once in a while", but closer to "every day".


I write scripts, but they're very elementary affairs. Nevertheless, they save me an incredible amount of time. It's pretty amazing what you can do with a simple knowlege of commands, a little ingenuity, and search and replace.

Scripting

My own scripts are typically in Ruby, Python and PHP (the latter for web based stuff).

Unfortunately, my bash shell programming skills are weak, and I've always planned to take a couple of days to do a crash course study marathon of bash shell programming. No excuse for not doing it, just lazy, I guess.

I don't like Perl, but I've customized a few Perl scripts to meet my needs, with reference book in hand.

In my opinion, basic system scripting creation/modification is one of the steps from basic Linux user to intermediate user. Of course the real gurus (which I'm not) can do it in their sleep.

Ahhhh, yes! Servers!

I was just trying to be funny, but servers would certainly explain it.

22 per cent of you never use the GUI at ALL?

I'd estimate that 17 per cent of the rest of us actually believe you.

Re: 22 per cent of you never use the GUI at ALL?

It really depends on the distribution.
I use ArchLinux. Our package manager is called pacman. It's only cli. There is no working gui frontend for it.
Cli doesn't mean unfriendly and vim is very user friendly.

I believe it.

I think it's conceivable that I could live without a GUI for a month at a time. If I had to right now, I could... it might be a little uncomfortable at first, but I'd get used to it real quick. I can already edit files, compile programs, surf the web, remotely control my school's development server, play games, print and scan, play music and watch videos... I can also make use of my six available virtual terminals, or I can fire up Screen and be able to run multiple programs simultaneously in one terminal.

I think I'll make that my goal for January: Go the whole month without using a GUI (except for when I absolutely have to use one of the school computers running Windows, in which case I'll immediately SSH into my machine with Putty 99% of the time.

__________________________________________________________________
Ubuntu is lame as a duck- not the metaphorical lame duck, but more like a real duck that hurt its leg, maybe by stepping on a land mine.

I'm sure you could do it.

Spinlock wrote:
I think it's conceivable that I could live without a GUI for a month at a time. If I had to right now, I could... it might be a little uncomfortable at first, but I'd get used to it real quick. I can already edit files, compile programs, surf the web, remotely control my school's development server, play games, print and scan, play music and watch videos... I can also make use of my six available virtual terminals, or I can fire up Screen and be able to run multiple programs simultaneously in one terminal.

I think I'll make that my goal for January: Go the whole month without using a GUI (except for when I absolutely have to use one of the school computers running Windows, in which case I'll immediately SSH into my machine with Putty 99% of the time.

Oh, I'm sure you could do it, if you could resist the temptation. I did it once. My computer broke down, the mobo was on warranty and had to go back to the factory, and the only thing I had was an old Pentium with 32 MB RAM. I ran it from the console with Slackware 11. There were limitations of course, but it ran great, it was a lot of fun, and I think I actually got more work done. I keep telling myself I should run from the console more, but I can never resist the lure of the gui.

re: believe it

I use commandline only on my server, and that's what I figured most of those "only cli" answers were about. On my desktop I use the cli for all my file and system management and nano for quick edits, but I love my kontact and konqueror. I'd hate to get by without those.

cli makes me lazy

Hehe, It's like I already have gnome-terminal open anyway so I just use vim instead of moving the mouse pointer all the way to other side of the screen and opening gedit. Big Grin Smile

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