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Now it’s Open Document Format’s turn for the FUDmeisters.

Filed under
OSS

Okay, lets get one thing straight…

Repeat after me :

“The Open Document Foundation has nothing to do with the Open Document Format”
“The Open Document Foundation has nothing to do with the Open Document Format”
“The Open Document Foundation has nothing to do with the Open Document Format”

Really, they should change their name. For one thing, it’s confusing and diluting the acronym for the Open Document Format. Another thing is, they, (The Open Document Foundation - see what I mean?) appear to be very, very confused about what they are doing; or if they’re not confused about what they’re doing, then they’re being very successful at confusing everyone else.

Not only that, but they’re also succeeding in helping others create FUD about the Open Document Format .

The latest example of which is an article by Peter Galli, of eweek, entitled “Document Format Dispute Spills into the Open“.

More Here




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