Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Google's Boycott Misses the Mark

Filed under
Web

Google is all for googling, as long as you don't google a Google executive.

That's the lesson that Jai Singh, CNET News.com founder and top editor, learned the hard way when the company informed him that no one from Google would speak to anyone at News.com for a full year.

"We are not happy with the situation and would like it to work out," Singh said. "Other companies have had issues with our reportage," but this was the first time he could recall a company actually blacklisting a news organization.

The boycott came to light last week when News.com began including a twist on the standard corporate response in articles relating to Google. It read, "Google could not be immediately reached for comment. (Google representatives have instituted a policy of not talking with CNET News.com reporters until July 2006 in response to privacy issues raised by a previous story.)"

That previous story, which News.com linked to, was headlined "Google Balances Privacy, Reach," and showed just how much information Google has placed at our fingertips. To illustrate, staff writer Elinor Mills spent 30 minutes googling Eric Schmidt, Google's chief executive officer, then published Schmidt's net worth ($1.5 billion), his net gain from selling Google stock this year ($140 million), the town he calls home (Atherton, California), the fact that he is an amateur pilot and "roamed the desert at the Burning Man art festival in Nevada."

"That such detailed personal information is so readily available on public websites makes most people uncomfortable," Mills wrote. "But it's nothing compared with the information Google collects and doesn't make public." She worried that "hackers, zealous government investigators or even a Google insider who falls short of the company's ethics standards could abuse that information."

The question is how could a company like Google, which has become the toast of Wall Street, have such tone-deaf public relations?

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Security: FOSS Updates, More on Marcus Hutchins

Development: DragonEgg, GCC, LLVM, and Java EE

Kernel and Graphics: Android Kernels, Mesa, and Vulkan 1.0.59

  • Android kernels: does upstream matter?
    There is this false narrative floating around in the dev community on how upstreaming breaks drivers and OEM code. Upstreaming breaking drivers and OEM code is not universally true- in contrast, it defies the very definition of a stable kernel. You see, each and every Android device out there runs a version of the Linux Kernel– and it doesn’t have to be the latest version all the time.
  • Mesa 17.2-RC5 Released, Final Should Come Within One Week
    The fifth and final planned release candidate of Mesa 17.2 is now available for testing.
  • Vulkan 1.0.59 Released With Shader Stencil Export
    Vulkan 1.0.59 is now available this weekend as the latest minor update to this high-performance graphics API. As usual, the bulk of this Vulkan 1.0.x point release is made up of document clarification/fixes to the text. Of those changes, nothing too notable stands out for Vulkan 1.0.59 but there is one new extension.

Games: Pillars of Eternity, Ryan "Icculus" Gordon, Paradox Interactive and HTC Vive