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Lloyd’s Insures Open Source

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OSS

Lloyd’s of London and Open Source Risk Management (OSRM) are putting the finishing touches on a deal that will grant comprehensive insurance protection to open-source users and vendors.

OSRM, a two-year-old company focused on protecting the open-source community from litigation risks, said that it is working with a number of insurance carriers but is close to announcing an arrangement whereby it will become Lloyd’s’ exclusive U.S. representative to the open-source community.

Vendor-Neutral
“We have a vendor-neutral and a collaborative approach so we are working with others in various stages to bring about insurance for open-source software,” said John St. Clair, chief operating officer of OSRM. “We could be particularly helpful to organizations using open-source software from various vendors. They can obtain insurance from one source rather than from many of them.”

Mr. St. Clair said that insurance in the open-source community is a complicated matter because open-source software is included in various forms in many proprietary software programs that come into an enterprise.

A number of well-financed and stable open-source vendors, including Red Hat, Novell, Hewlett-Packard, and JBoss, have announced the availability of various forms of insurance protection for open-source customers.

Full Article.

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