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Ubuntu 7.10 - Not the Linux I Knew and Loved

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Ubuntu

I have been a big supporter of Ubuntu over the last few years and I have been using Ubuntu for many, many releases. I turned several friends onto Linux using Ubuntu and one of them has been quite excited about the operating system. Over the past year or so the Linux fan boys have been pushing eye candy on Ubuntu touting it as ahead of both Microsoft and Apple's desktop operating systems. From the beginning I worried about this for a couple reasons, and I noticed beginning with the last release of Ubuntu that the distro was becoming a bit heavy. In my opinion this eye candy stuff is quickly destroying what was so great about Ubuntu.

I will just say that two of the desktops in my house use an ATI card and I realize that ATI for a long time has not exactly been helpful to the Linux community. But, both these machines ran Ubuntu for the last couple years quite nicely. My main desktop is only a couple years old and for all intensive purposes it is a beast. I ran Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon since it was an alpha release on my main desktop. I ran into typical ATI issues on my main desktop machine and with it also having a widescreen display I had to make some additional tweaks to the xorg.conf but I was okay with this. I expected issues since I started running Ubuntu as the alpha on this machine. I am now running the fully updated Ubuntu 7.10 on this machine and it is working great, but again, the machine is a beast.

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The GNOME Foundation Backs Librem 5

  • GNOME Foundation partners with Purism to support its efforts to build the Librem 5 smartphone
    The GNOME Foundation has provided their endorsement and support of Purism’s efforts to build the Librem 5, which if successful will be the world’s first free and open smartphone with end-to-end encryption and enhanced user protections. The Librem 5 is a hardware platform the Foundation is interested in advancing as a GNOME/GTK phone device. The GNOME Foundation is committed to partnering with Purism to create hackfests, tools, emulators, and build awareness that surround moving GNOME/GTK onto the Librem 5 phone. As part of the collaboration, if the campaign is successful the GNOME Foundation plans to enhance GNOME shell and general performance of the system with Purism to enable features on the Librem 5.
  • Now GNOME Foundation Wants to Support Purism's Privacy-Focused Linux Smartphone
    GNOME Foundation, the non-profit organization behind the popular GNOME desktop environment designed for Linux-based operating systems, announced on Wednesday that they plan on supporting Purism's Librem 5 smartphone. The announcement comes only a week after KDE unveiled their plans to work with Purism on an implementation of their Plasma Mobile interface into the security- and privacy-focused Librem 5 Linux smartphone, and now GNOME is interested in advancing the Librem 5 hardware platform as a GNOME/GTK+ phone device. "Having a Free/Libre and Open Source software stack on a mobile device is a dream-come-true for so many people, and Purism has the proven team to make this happen. We are very pleased to see Purism and the Librem 5 hardware be built to support GNOME," said Neil McGovern, Executive Director, GNOME Foundation.
  • GNOME Joins The Librem 5 Party, Still Needs To Raise One Million More Dollars
    One week after announcing KDE cooperation on the proposed Librem 5 smartphone with plans to get Plasma Mobile on the device if successful, the GNOME Foundation has sent out their official endorsement of Purism's smartphone dream. Purism had been planning to use GNOME from the start for their GNU/Linux-powered privacy-minded smartphone while as of today they have the official backing of the GNOME Foundation.

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Sometimes while I review distros I come across some cool distros that many persons don’t know about. PCLinuxOS is one of them. A user-friendly, stable and quite cool in features and app selection are the things that made me love this distro. Read
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