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Quakecon 2005 id Software Keynote Coverage: Carmack Talks

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Gaming

It is another hot August in Texas, and that means Quakecon. The highlight is always the id presentation topped off with programmer and rocketeer extraordinaire John Carmack's chat with the audience. We will find out more about Quake 4 including viewing the E3 trailer. We will find out about what Carmack thinks of the hype surrounding the next generation consoles. John will also reveal how he feels about current CPU and GPU technology. The benefits and challenges of multithreading will be covered as well his thoughts on dedicated physics cards. Also don't forget about the latest on Armadillo Aerospace, what car John is driving, and why he thinks cell phone gaming in the next year or so could be where we find our next new gaming genre from. Hold on as we dig in deep to another information packed id Quakecon presentation and the first live John Carmack game tech talk and Q and A session since 2002.

We begin our coverage on the subject of Quake 4 which finally at E3 saw the light of day, and at Quakecon is available for play on systems in the Activision booth. This highly anticipated title blends the multiplayer experience of Quake 3 with the single player campaign similar to that of Quake 2. Developer Raven has been put at the realm of the project that has been in the works for some time. The Quake 4 demo was run live as it was at E3 and the reaction was positive throughout. They were on hand with the id staffers to answer a few questions the audience submitted on cards before John took over.

Raven stressed that the multiplayer and single player experience were both getting significant resources put behind them. Quake 4 will not be lopsided in that respect. A large focus will be put on mod tools that will ship with game out of the box. They want to make modding the game be very easy which of course had been a trend for some time. The only significant mod of late has been the Quake 2 mod of Doom 3, and no multiplayer OSP style competition mod came to fruition.

Touching on the system specifications they revealed that if you system can play Doom 3 you will be fine with Quake 4 as was expected. The system playing it was a 3.4GHz P4 Falcon Northwest box with a 6800 running at 1280X1024. The Doom 3 engine was enhanced by Raven with improved physics and of course included support for vehicles which is something we also saw at E3 with Prey. Raven's ultimate goal with game was to keep it fun with unique experiences and no dull moments.

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