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Eeextremely Eeenticing: a review of the Asus Eee PC

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Linux
Hardware
Reviews

The Asus Eee PC challenges many conventional assumptions about mobile computing. The daring, diminutive device combines a svelte subnotebook form factor with a unique Linux software platform and a budget-friendly price—factors that could make this unprecedented product a mainstream marvel. Last week, my colleague Jon described the Eee PC as game-changing: a characterization that we will put to the test in this review.

First impressions
The most striking characteristic of the Eee PC is its unbelievably small size. At 8.9" x 6.5" x 1.4" and approximately 2.03lb, the Eee delivers serious mobility. When closed, it's approximately the same size as a hardcover book. It's also very easy to tote around while it is open and can be comfortably held in only one hand. The exterior has a glossy, pearl-white finish that picks up fingerprints very easily, but seems a bit more dirt-resistant than the plain white finish of a MacBook. According to Asus, the Eee PC will eventually be available in a range of colors, including pink, green, and black.

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