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Austrumi 0.9.7 Released

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In case you didn't know, Austrumi is a business card size (50MB) bootable Live CD Linux distribution based on 'Slackware GNU Linux' using'Blin' initialisation scripts. I looked at version 0.9.5 back in May and found it to be a great little mini distro. At that time it had wonderful fonts and amazing speed to add enjoyment to using the many apps included in that teny tiny 48mb. Version 0.9.7 was released a coupla days ago and I wanted to see what was new.

The most noticable improvement (should I say difference?) is the use of OpenBox for the window manager. Previously FVMW was used and it was nice, but OpenBox is looking really good. It has a compact tabbed configuration and comes with 4 attractive themes/window decorations. The developers have added fbpanel to the desktop to make that wonderful application launcher and set the tone with a nice relaxing wallpaper. That lake looks good enough to jump in, as we've been having quite the heatwave here in the Southern US passed week or so.

The X version is the same at 6.8.2 from February, but the kernel has been updated to a 2.6.12. Emelfm has been update to emelfm2 as well as many other application updates. It still has nice fonts, blazing speed, and a wonderful selection of applications. The applications functioned well including mplayer, both as a movie player and as streaming radio player. (Austrumi has some preset radio channels in their menu). Austrumi's computer requirements haven't changed and still consist of a pentium-grade cpu, 96 mb ram, and a bootable cdrom drive.

The hard drive installer is improved as well. It looks better, given a better layout and appears more user-friendly. It doesn't seem to restrict installs to the first partition of the first device any longer, however it still doesn't install the operating system. Baby steps I suppose. I bet next time it'll work. I have confidence in 'em.

According to the site, its changelog consists of:

  • removed fvwm95 added openbox

  • Olga Prohorenkova made the new design of the website and help files
  • added fbpanel - GTK2-based desktop panel
  • removed emelfm added emelfm2
  • added gtkdialog - GUI-creation utility
  • updated abiword, atomix, ettercap, gftp, xchat, uebimiau, unrar, xorg
  • removed xpai added phpxmail(xmail administration)
  • updated kernel(2.6.12)

If you are in the market for a small business card sized bootable os or need something really nice to run on lower spec machines, I couldn't think of too many better systems to use. I really like Austrumi and will be keeping you posted.

More Screenshots in the gallery. My previous report is here if you'd like a more in-depth introduction and list of included applications. Thanks for visiting my site today, and you have a good one!

re: Austrumi

> Next release may be the beginning of the end of tiny Linux; Austrumi will go mini?

Oh nooo, say it ain't so...

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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