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What Are the DesktopBSD Tools?

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BSD

There are a few things the average Windows or Linux user takes for granted. Of course your system boots into a graphical interface and when you plugin your USB stick, it appears on your desktop. Both under Linux and *BSD the graphical interface is a matter of choice and preference, something to be changed by entering a few instructions on the command line. Last time I checked – and to be honest, that was some time ago – FreeBSD booted into the command line and I had to start the X-server manually. No big thing, but daunting enough I you expect a graphical work environment.

Compared to most Linux desktops DesktopBSD appears to be just another open source desktop. But when you are used to the text-based install of FreeBSD and the command line as the default interface, the difference is striking. We have already seen the graphical installer of DesktopBSD and today we will have a closer look at the various specific tools that were designed to make for a better user experience.

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