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Code of Conduct for OSI Mailing Lists

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Since there has been some confusion as of late, I've posted an updated Code of Conduct. Hopefully this (along with planned charter revisions) will improve our overall mailing list climate.

These guidelines define a code of conduct for members of the various OSI public mailing lists, which function as the committees of the Open Source Initiative. Note that failure to observe these guidelines, or instructions from the moderators, may be grounds for reprimand, probation, or removal.


Mailing lists, like open source projects, require intense collaboration on issues people are passionate (and often sensitive) about. Make an extra effort to treat others with the respect you would like to receive, even if you feel they are treating you unfairly. If you have something negative or critical to say to someone, email them privately, off-list. If you feel someone is behaving inappropriately, contact the moderator.


Do not post off-list emails from other parties without their permission. What happens off-list, stays off-list.

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