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Firefox 3 Beta 1 takes me on one wild ride

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Moz/FF

Always a patsy for the New and Shiny, today I decided to believe what I read about Firefox 3 in the press. I downloaded the tarball, unpacked it, and ran Firefox 3 Beta 1 on my Ubuntu 7.10 system. Loads of fun!

One of Firefox 3's touted 'features' is its supposed cutback of memory usage. I use Firefox on every OS I touch, and over the course of many days it can consume quite a bit of memory, especially if you have loads of tabs open like I do. Well, after shutting down Firefox 2 and starting Firefox 3, I noticed that its memory footprint was around 60 MB, and this was after loading with all my open tabs. Then, in a blink of an eye, Firefox 3 Beta started consuming memory like a Santa Ana fanned wildfire consumes a California forest. As you'll note above Gnome's System Monitor is clocking the increase of physical and virtual memory at a rapid clip, with physical memory being pegged pretty quickly. It wound up consuming over 900MB of physical memory.

I'd also like to point out that during this period of out-of-control memory growth that desktop responsiveness went to hell in a hand basket.

More Here




Also: Review: Firefox 3 Beta 1 -- Packed With New Features And Rock Solid

And: Mozilla warns against using new Firefox 3.0 beta

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