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Reiser Murder Trial Theme Emerging: Wife Was a Good Mom, Bad Mom

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Reiser

Witness No. 3 continued on the stand Tuesday in the Hans Reiser murder trial, and she quickly became the subject of several insults under cross examination by the defendant's attorney.

Alameda County Superior Court Judge Larry Goodman quickly put a halt to the abrasion. "You can do it in a respectful manner," Goodman admonished defense attorney William DuBois.

At one point during the morning session, DuBois suggested that Hans Reiser's former wife or her estate ironically stands to inherit the husband's Namesys company that produced Linux file systems if Hans Reiser is convicted of killing her.

The defense claims the husband did not kill the woman in a bid to end a bitter divorce, as prosecutors allege. Instead, she abandoned her two preschool-aged children after becoming a U.S. citizen and fled to Russia, where she met her husband as a mail-order bride, DuBois said in his opening statements three weeks ago.

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Also: Hans Reiser Trial: November 27, 2007




My 50 cents

Whenever I see these stories in GNU/Linux/OSS Web sites, I cannot help but wonder why they further associate family problems and a personal affairs with Linux programming/news. There is a huge number of FOSS programmers out there.

I hope I don't anger anyone, but this drama may have more to do with the Reisers' lives and less to do with technical things.

re: My 50 cents

You know the media's credo: "no spin = no win".

If they didn't put the semi-successful geek spin on it, it'd be just another story about a missing person assumed to be murdered trial.

Absolutely. That's why it

Absolutely. That's why it annoys me. This whole case had *nothing* to do with Linux as far as I know.

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