Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Options for Linux growth exist beyond the desktop

Filed under
OSS

There was some discussion at the LinuxWorld Conference & Exposition about how Linux and open source are already in the enterprise, and that new growth opportunities need to be identified now that the foothold is becoming a base of operations.

A keynote by Hewlett-Packard's executive vice president Ann Livermore focused on this topic, and touched on the future direction of open source and its continuing impact on the IT industry.

For an objective look and further analysis of these new frontiers and the overall open source revolution, SearchEnterpriseLinux.com spoke with Illuminata Research senior analyst Gordon Haff. Haff says the ever-growing world of Linux and open source goes far beyond the desktop, an arena still dominated by Microsoft, and may be coming to an appliance near you.

The HP keynote centered on many of the issues that users already associated with Linux. What's the real story here, where can Linux grow now that's it well established in the enterprise?

Gordon Haff: Certainly Linux and open source is maturing at some level at the enterprise level, but from LinuxWorld to LinuxWorld there is a lot less that is a big surprise; that is radically new and different. There used to be similar trends with conferences about Unix servers every six months, but what was the really big news there? In the end the answer was there was not a huge amount at the macro scale; obviously there were new releases for products, but the big picture rarely changes.

Now, at LinuxWorld there is Debian and Gentoo; clearly there is an interest at least in some quarters, but again even then that's not anything new. I think in particular as Linux has gotten more mature, and more robust and so forth, at least for certain applications a lot of people are saying I don't need to pay Red Hat or Novell. This is primarily in North America where they are saying they don't need to pay them large sums of money that they could instead save by acquiring and downloading something that basically works the same way. Certainly it goes without saying that there are still plenty of cases where people are still willing to pay, but the other side is gaining.

Is there any apprehension as more companies go with the non-commercial options in Debian and Gentoo?

Full Interview.

More in Tux Machines

The Linux desktop-a-week review: LXDE

Over the last two weeks I’ve run nothing but LXDE as my primary Linux Desktop Environment (other than a few excursions into Android land). Been using LXDE. Been enjoying LXDE. But I have practically nothing to really say about LXDE. I feel like, after all this time, I should have something interesting to talk about. But I just plain don’t. It’s fast, blisteringly fast. And it’s damned lightweight too. After that, things get pretty boring. Read more

LG’s first SoC debuts on 5.9-inch G3 Screen phone

LG announced its first SoC, a Cortex-15 and –A7 octa-core “Nuclun” with LTE-A Cat.6 tech that debuts this week in a Korea-bound LG G3 Screen Android phone. LG Electronics has decided to follow in Samsung’s footsteps and create its own ARM system-on-chip for its mobile devices. LG, which has mostly used Qualcomm processors in the past, announced an octa-core Nuclun SoC, which will debut on a 5.9-inch, Android 4.4 based LG G3 Screen phablet that will go on sale this week in Korea. Read more

Neptune OS 4.2 Features a Refreshing KDE Desktop

ZevenOS-Neptune 4.x branch is called "It's all about you" and it was initially made available back in June. This is the second update for the distribution and the devs have refined some of the features and have added some new packages into the mix. The system is based on KDE, but don't expect to find a regular stock version implemented. It's clear that the devs have put a lot of effort into making the DE experiences unique. Users can immediately recognize what distribution they are looking at just with a glance, and that's always a good sign. Read more

How to Get Open Source Android

Android is an astonishing commercial success, and is often touted as a Linux success. In some ways it is; Google was able to leverage Linux and free/open source software to get Android to market in record time, and to offer a feature set that quickly outstripped the old champion iOS. But it's not Linux as we know it. Most Android devices are locked-down, and we can't freely download and install whatever operating systems we want like we can with our Linux PCs, or install whatever apps we want without jailbreaking our own devices that we own. We can't set up a business to sell Google Android devices without jumping through a lot of expensive hoops (see The hidden costs of building an Android device and Secret Ties in Google's "Open" Android.) We can't even respin Google Android however we want to and redistribute it, because Google requires bundling a set of Google apps. Read more