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OpenOffice.org 2.3 Impresses

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OOo

The release of OpenOffice.org 2.3 brings several significant improvements to the open-source office productivity suite, including easier upgrade paths for existing Microsoft Office users, improved measures to prevent security breaches, and an array of snazzy new features introduced in the suite's word processing, spreadsheet, presentation and database applications.

Meanwhile, all-around improvements to the suite's presentation application, Impress, continue to give users some of the bells and whistles coveted in PowerPoint, such as the ability to now integrate sound across an entire presentation.

General improvements made to the spreadsheet application, Calc, and word processing application, Writer, make the case for OpenOffice 2.3 as a potentially easier and definitely cheaper upgrade path for existing Microsoft Office users, who may be considering a transition to Microsoft Office 2007.

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Speaking of OpenOffice.org, it is one of the best quality open source programs. My second favorite is Gimp. I really can't believe something this good can be for free.
I just compiled and installed OpenOffice 2.3.1rc1 last week and it's running brilliantly.

re: Link won't open

Still seems to work here in Konqueror and Firefox. <shrugs>

re: Link won't open

It seems to open now, thanks Smile

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