Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

How to make Kontact work with Google Apps

Filed under
HowTos

Recently, Gmail added IMAP support, giving the powerhouse email host the ability to interact better with third-party clients. And Google, being the friendly neighborhood do-gooder that it is, provided instructions on how to use IMAP with a variety of third-party clients. However, it forgot one popular client: KMail, the email portion of the KDE Kontact personal information management suite. Google also neglected to mention that several of its other services, such as Google Calendar and Google Reader, can work well with Kontact. Here's how you can integrate them.

Let's start with KMail. Go to Settings -> Configure KMail, select the Accounts tab, and click Add to create an incoming account. Select "IMAP" as the type. Type in a descriptive name for your account name (I chose Gmail), your email address as your login (e.g. johnsmith@gmail.com), your password, imap.gmail.com as your host, and 993 as your port. Switch over to the Security tab and check "Use SSL for secure mail download." Click OK, then click on the Sending tab and click Add to create an outgoing account. Make the type "SMTP." Enter a description under name, smtp.gmail.com under the host, and 465 as the port. Then check "Server requires authentication" and make the login your email address (e.g. johnsmith@gmail.com) and your password. Switch over to the Security tab and make the encryption "SSL" and the authentication method "plain." You're done!

More Here




More in Tux Machines

How Linux containers can solve a problem for defense virtualization

As the virtualization of U.S. defense agencies commences, the technology’s many attributes—and drawbacks—are becoming apparent. Virtualization has enabled users to pack more computing power in a smaller space than ever before. It has also created an abstraction layer between the operating system and hardware, which gives users choice, flexibility, vendor competition and best value for their requirements. But there is a price to be paid in the form of expensive and cumbersome equipment, software licensing and acquisition fees, and long install times and patch cycles. Read more

Fedora 21: Linux fans will LOVE it - after the install woes

With Fedora's installer it isn't immediately clear what you need to do – or even that you need to do something – until you click each button and find out, which runs the "select your layout" and installs. It's not that bad; it's not like installing Arch, but it did leave me wondering “why?” Why not just go with the familiar, narrative-like sliding screen animation that, well, pretty much every other OS out there uses? Read more

Customers reporting interest in cloud, containers, Linux, OpenStack for 2015

As 2014 comes to a close and IT departments reflect on their initiatives heading into the new year, we asked a group of 115 Red Hat customers -- ranging from Fortune 500 companies to small businesses -- about their priorities for 2015. What we heard from the respondents is promising going into the new year: Budgets are increasing (or at least staying the same); Linux adoption is increasing; cloud deployments will be dominantly private or hybrid; OpenStack is hot; and interest in containers is emerging. Read more

Multi-Stream Transport 4K Monitors To Become Better Supported On Linux

For a number of months David Airlie at Red Hat has been working on DisplayPort Multi-Stream Transport (DP MST) handling for Linux. Keith Packard over at Intel is now playing with DP MST too for bettering modern 4K display support on Linux within X.Org Server based environments. Read more