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ASUS P5K-E WiFi vs. Gigabyte P35-DS4

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While all of the rage recently has been around Intel's X38 Express Chipset (used on such motherboards as the P5E3 Deluxe and X38-DQ6), there is still plenty of life left in Intel's P35 "Bearlake" Chipset. The Intel P35 is only a few months older, but it contains most of the same features as the flagship X38 aside from the PCI Express 2.0 support and a Hardware Memory Prefetcher. We have previously reviewed Intel P35 motherboards such as the ASUS Blitz Extreme and Gigabyte P35-DS3P, but in this review, we are going back and looking at two more of these Intel Bearlake motherboards. At hand today we have the ASUS P5K-E WiFi and Gigabyte P35-DS4 motherboards, both of which are similar in many respects and use the P35 + ICH9R combination with DDR2 memory.

P5K-E Contents:
The P5K-E WiFi was packaged similar to most other ASUS motherboards, with a cardboard divider separating the motherboard from all of the accessories. Included with the P5K-E WiFi-AP Solo were an ASUS Q-Connector Kit, two Serial ATA data cables, one 4-pin molex to SATA power adapter, I/O panel, 802.11 WiFi antenna, IDE ribbon cable, FDD ribbon cable, driver CD, and the motherboard's user manual. These accessories aren't nearly as elaborate as what was found with the ASUS Blitz Extreme, which is part of the Republic of Gamers series.

A-P35-DS4 Contents:
Included with the Gigabyte P35-DS4 was a ribbon IDE cable, ribbon FDD cable, four Serial ATA data cables, Intel processor installation guide, IEEE-1394 Firewire expansion slot header, I/O panel, Gigabyte sticker, Gigabyte driver CD, product manual, hardware installation guidebook, eSATA expansion slot header, eSATA data cable, and an external 4-pin molex to Serial ATA power adapter. Gigabyte's eSATA accessories with the GA-P35-DS4 are great to see and are certainly useful.

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