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Review: Linux Mint 4.0

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Linux
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Mint has struck again! The developers of this elegant Linux distribution are back with a new version of their elegant Linux distribution for you to enjoy. As you may remember, in our previous review of Linux Mint, we introduced you to a Linux desktop that was both elegant and practical for both the new and experienced Linux user. We explored their motto of "From freedom came elegance" and found it to be true in many ways. We even looked at a lot of features that eventaully won Linux Mint a place on our short list of recommended Linux distributions. But now that a new version has arrived on the scene, we're left with one nagging question. What makes Linux Mint 4.0 better than the existing 3.0 version we previously reviewed? Well, a number of things apparently. So let's look at each of these new improvements and see what they have to offer you and if they can truely make Linux Mint 4.0 better than its predicessor.

Initial Impressions

The latest version of Linux Mint, codenamed "Daryna" (don't ask me how to pronounce that because I still haven't figured it out myself) is based on both the Celena version of Linux Mint (version 3.1) and Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon (version 7.10 of Ubuntu). For those worried about the interface changing a lot, don't fear, because it really hasn't. All the familiar features and organization of Mint are still there, including in the Mint menu. But aside from its familiarity, Mint 4.0 isn't without it's problems. One of the things I found early on was a fair degree of instability in the general system. While it wasn't crashing all over the place, it was still a bit unstable. I even had the background crash and die at least once on me taking the desktop icons and all desktop features with it, which is almost unheard of in other distributions, including Ubuntu.

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