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The Linux® Trademark - Tempest in a Teapot

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Linux

Why, oh why, some wonder, would lawyers be sending out letters in Australia, asking folks using the mark LINUX to formally license the mark? And *pay* for it? What is this? A violation of the spirit of openness? Doesn't the GPL mean you can do whatever you like with the name? Isn't Linus' policy that people can pretty much use the Linux name as long as they are decent about it?

First, it's coming ultimately from Linus. There is a web site you can visit to verify that policing the mark has been given to the Linux Mark Institute by Linus, and the page is hosted by OSDL.

I don't know about you, but I get disturbed when I see antiLinux folk using the name Linux. For example, I thought it was loathsome to call the newsletter Linux Business Week, when all it was about was antiLinux material. I gather Business Week didn't much care for the name either, so they had to change the name. But what about Linux Insider? All they ever seem to report is antiLinux news. If I owned the Linux trademark, I'd want to make them stop, if I could.

Full Article.

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