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Asus Eee PC 701 Review

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Linux
Hardware
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Introduction / Hardware

The Eee PC (pronounced as a single E) is marketed as an "Easy to Learn, Easy to Work, Easy to Play" computer. Due to its size, it is classified as an Ultra-Mobile PC (UMPC). Whilst ultra-portable notebooks often weigh about 2kg, the Eee PC is a featherweight 0.92kg. It is therefore an ultra-mobile machine in the true sense of the expression. The machine is small enough that it can be used in just about any environment. However, this is a full PC, not just a 'mobile Internet' device like Nokia's Internet tablets.

The Asus Eee PC has received considerable pre-launch media coverage. Not without reason, it isn't every day that a well specified device undercuts its competition in price by a considerable margin. This particular model retails in the US and UK for $400 and £220 respectively. I've been patiently waiting for many months for the Asus Eee PC to be released in Europe. That day finally came just a few weeks ago.

This review aims to provide readers with an in-depth treatment of the Eee, using an actual retail unit, instead of a pre-production model. This is important in a number of respects. Earlier models had a different BIOS, which, for example, did not provide full speed USB2.0 ports. Hopefully, having tested an actual retail model, the review should give a true representation of what this machine can actually do.

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