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Apple OS X update breaks 64-bit applications

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An update that Apple released earlier this week has broken support for 64-bit applications in its OS X operating system.

Mathematica 5.2 from Wolfram Research is one of the affected applications. The latest version was released last month and uses the 64-bit capabilities in OS X. The application offers technical computing for use in science, engineering, math and finance.

"Due to an error on the part of Apple, this update prevents any 64-bit-native application from running," Wolfram Research said in an email sent out to customers on Tuesday.

Mathematica has provided its users with a script that temporarily makes the application run in 32-bit mode while Apple is working on an fix.

Apple declined to comment.

Sources familiar with the matter told that the problem was caused by a library that was missing from the update. They expected an update to be released as soon as Wednesday.

Apple on Monday night released a security update that fixed 44 security vulnerabilities in its software.

The company's line of G5 powered PowerMacs and Xserve servers running the OS X 10.4 operating system are capable of running 64-bit applications.

By Tom Sanders

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