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Hans Reiser Said Wife, Family 'Were a Financial Burden,' Witness Says

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Reiser

Two witnesses testified Monday at Hans Reiser's murder trial that the Linux programmer's wife and family were a burden, and that he would be better off without them. His wife disappeared months later.

"During that conversation, did the defendant actually say something that stuck out in your mind?" prosecutor Paul Hora asked Blair Conry-Murray.

Conry-Murray was at a party in April, 2006, when she struck up a conversation with the computer programmer, whose children went to the same private preschool and elementary school in Oakland.

"He said that his family and Nina were a financial burden to him and that he felt he would be fine financially if he did not have to take care of them," the witness replied. "He was complaining about Nina."

"What was your reaction?" Hora asked a few questions later.

"I thought it was a strange thing to say. It really stood out to me. I thought it was inappropriate."

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Also: Hans Reiser Trial: Dec. 10, 2007




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