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Paldo melds source-based and binary in one distro

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Linux

Paldo Linux is a cross between a source-based and binary distribution. It installs as a binary system to provide a quick and easy desktop. Once it's running, users can either build packages from source as they would with Gentoo, or install binary packages, as is common with Debian, openSUSE, or Mandriva. Paldo's main features are an easy hard drive installer, GNOME desktop environment, and Upkg package management system. Stable version 1.12 was released last month. I found it to be one of the more interesting and promising distros to come along in a long time.

Paldo Linux is released as an installable live CD with versions for x86 and x86_64 architectures. Several languages are available at the boot screen, including various dialects of English, Portuguese, Dutch, and German. Paldo boots quickly, and I saw the Nvidia proprietary driver splash screen on my way to my desktop. The desktop is tidy and attractive in shades of blue and gray. My resolution was correctly autoconfigured, as was my sound card and other basic hardware. I used Ndiswrapper to import and load the drivers for the wireless Ethernet chip on my Hewlett-Packard Pavilion dv6105us laptop, and the GNOME networking applet connected to my Wi-Fi Protected Access network.

Since the desktop was pretty and my hardware was well-supported, I decided to install the system permanently.

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