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How Not to Define Linux

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Linux

A friend of mine asked me if Linux was getting too commoditized and too ordinary. A fellow Linux user, he seemed worried about the "wow" factor of Linux dropping below the point where it would capture any interest.

My immediate response was to frame my answer in terms of Linux Today. Basically, I told him, I wasn't concerned about the lack of interesting news regarding Linux. Linux is far too diverse and broad of a platform to let news about it fall away to nothing. I predicted that other proprietary companies will become less and less interesting in a news-sense as time goes on, because their news is controlled by single entities. People recognize that more and more lately, and the desire for independent news sources is still growing.

Later in the week, I realized that I may not have answered my friend's question in the manner that he wanted. He mentioned a decline in interest in Linux, and my knee-jerk reaction was to couch it in publishing terms.

If you have taken philosophy or sociology or have just hung around bars for a goodly length of time, you will know that this is nothing new. We all tend to frame the world around us in our own terms, locked away inside of our skulls day in and day out. But it tweaked an idea in me that I thought I would share.

I think total cost of ownership studies are stupid.

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