Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Cashing in on Linux

Filed under
Linux

In polite society it is traditionally frowned upon to discuss topics which inspire strongly polarised opinion. This means religion, politics, sex, and Linux, should probably be left out of the conversation if friends and aquaintences want to maintain a civilised veneer.

But lets face it, there's nothing civilised or polite about the business world, and for some very good reasons Linux is the topic de jour.

According to Phil Sargeant, research vice president for servers and storage at IT research group Gartner, most Australia companies have already dipped their toes in open-source waters, and a few are now planning to open the flood gates installing Linux across their server clusters.

"A small percentage are now taking it much more seriously," Sargeant says. "Linux is experiencing a compound growth rate of 13 to 14 percent, and will continue to be the fastest growing server operating system over the next two years."

With tech giants like IBM, HP, and Dell all now supporting Linux-based server offerings in the enterprise, Sargeant believes the open-source operating system has become a much less risky proposition for most companies. As a result, we are likely to see it increasingly installed on mission critical systems over the next 12 to18 months.

"Linux has made its way into some interesting niches like Web services, and big number crunching, but now that the service is there people are starting to look for other places where it might work," Sargeant says.

With interest growing, Anupam Nagar, HP Australia's business manager for open source and Linux, says support is still a fundamental concern for companies considering adopting open-source solutions.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Is your company an open source parasite?

Getting involved in the open source projects that matter to a company, in other words, gives them more ability to influence their future today, even as dependence on a vendor results in putting one's future in the hands of that vendor to resolve on their timetable. It's simply not smart business, not if an open source alternative exists and your company already depends upon it. In sum, the GitHub contributor counts should be much higher, and not merely for those in the business of selling software (or tech, generally). Any company defined by software—and that's your company, too—needs to get more involved in both using and contributing open source software. Read more

LibreELEC Embedded Linux OS Now Compatible with Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

The LibreELEC 8.2.1 update is based on the latest Kodi 17.6 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center software and it mostly patches some Samba (SMB) "file exists" share errors on Windows 10 Fall Creators Update by updating the protocol to Samba 4.6.10, implementing SMB client options for minimum SMB protocol and an SMB legacy security option with NTLMv1, and disabling SPNEGO. "LibreELEC 8.2.x includes changes that allow the Kodi SMB client and our embedded Samba server to support SMB2/3 connections; deprecating SMB1 to improve security and performance. This is necessary to cope with changes Microsoft introduced in the Windows 10 ‘Fall Creators Update’ to resolve SMB1 security issues," explained the developers. Read more

Canonical Releases Major Kernel Update for Ubuntu 16.04 to Fix 13 Security Flaws

The update is a major one patching a total of 13 security flaws, including race conditions in Linux kernel's ALSA subsystem, the packet fanout implementation, and the key management subsystem, as well as use-after-free vulnerabilities in both the USB serial console driver and the ALSA subsystem. Various other issues were also patched for Linux kernel's key management subsystem, the Ultra Wide Band driver, the ALSA subsystem, the USB unattached storage driver, and the USB subsystem, which received the most attention in this update as several security flaws were recently disclosed. Read more

Graphics: NVIDIA and AMD