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Either shut up or do something about it.

Filed under
Linux

Have you noticed how everyone has an opinion about Linux and opensource in general?

Depending on where they stand, everyone is biased in their own way.

Journalists?
Well, their primary goal is to sensationalise what they hear, to get ad dollars. So they'll flip any way to anyone who pays...Like a whore? Smile

Critics?
They've got a bone to pick with everybody. Trolls? You really want to stay away from these folks, regardless.

Fanatics? Fanboys? "Enthusiastically passionate people"?
Everything they believe in is right, everybody else is wrong. It hasn't sunk into their heads that there is no right or wrong, there just is. I guess they're too proud to admit that they can be wrong.

Microsoft? (Competitors)
What do you expect from someone who sees you as the biggest threat to their existance? Every action they take has to be seen with suspicion. Their history is a collection of nefarious activities designed solely to keep their dominance and to crush competitors. You and I know that they're willing to do anything and everything to maintain it. Lie, cheat, bribe, spin, FUD, etc. There is no limit to what they're willing to do.

So what's the point of this blog entry?

Well, this will be my last. Let me explain why.

The above are distractions. They don't help opensource. In fact, they are a waste of time.

Throughout 2007, I've been doing a little soul searching and trying to find a purpose to my life. Over time, I've accumulated some wisdom. I've realised A LOT of people have opinions, because its easiest to criticise, etc about something, than it is actually doing something about it.

The world, my friends, is filled with two types of people.

(1) Those who sit on their butts, whine about how the world is unfair, something should be done better, how come there are no "good men/women", Why I'm alone?, How come I can't find a woman?, Why does this always happen to me? Blah, blah, blah...But they do nothing about it themselves. (or worse, they keep repeating the same approach over and over again in an insane loop!). These people don't lead or take their own initiatives. They follow. They let fear win. Its so when something goes wrong, they have someone to blame rather than take responsibility for their own actions. You can refer to these folks as "Critics" or "The negative".

OR

(2) These are the ones who go out there, and give it all they've got. It doesn't matter how long it takes them or the obstacles that stand in their way, they'll reach their goal. They're willing to endure the tediousness of becoming highly proficient at what they do. They're willing to accept rejection and being wrong to them is nothing but a lesson to learn. Where others have given up, these folks stay on with persistent enthusiasm. People like these are often unique in their own way. These are "Performers" or "The positive".

Some consider (2) as special. They're really not. The fact is, everyone is special, but we've been conditioned in some way that has led us to become a bunch of critics. Maybe its our education system? Who knows.

The thing is, everyone on this planet has these two characters within them. Its in our heads. Its who we choose to be, that makes us become either (1) or (2) on the outside. To some people, this is scary. It means we take responsibility for what we do. That includes when we stuff up.

What I'm trying to say is, I'm done with being (1). It achieves NOTHING, and deep down, we all know this. There is so much time being wasted in talking, typing, arguing, etc, that it becomes distracting to what we want to actually accomplish in our lives. It breaks our focus and concentration.

I know there are deficiencies with opensource software, and I'm gonna do something about it. Enough talk, I'm done talking. Time to act and stand on the shoulders of giants.

The beauty of opensource software isn't because its free in monetary terms, its that, there is a choice to do something about it. The question each and everyone should ask themselves is: What are you gonna do about it?

So, I say farewell to you all.

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