Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SUSE Linux 10.0 Beta 2 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

The "Lizard Blizzard" continues as OpenSUSE released Beta 2 of the upcoming SUSE Linux a coupla days ago. So what's new in this release since the August 9th release of Beta 1?


Most of the changes appear to have taken place beneath the hood, updating software versions, squashing bugs, kernel patches and the like. But to the nekked eye, upon boot one notices the koffice icon on the desktop has been replaced by an OpenOffice.org icon. The late developemental version 1.9.123 of OOo is presently included with OpenSUSE. I've been running a pre-2.0 version of OOo for months on my gentoo install due to some bugs (or updated dependencies), and have found it to be very stable and much nicer looking. Novell lays claim to a "Novell Edition" on OpenSUSE. I didn't note anything special about it other than a nice start splash. If anyone knows, please feel free to respond.

Another addition to the desktop is a systray icon for Beagle. Clicking on that opens the Beagle search tool. I supposed that could be a handy feature. Speaking of the Beagle search utility, it now also has a systray icon in gnome as well. So, now Beagle opens each login not only in KDE but gnome as well. I'm sure this has got to be a bug, I hope so.

Also included is KAT. It's not installed by default, but I did note references to updating to version 0.6.2. I first became aware of this wonderful utility with the release of Mandriva's 2006 Beta 2. In subsequent communication with the author I found it to be much more comprehensive than Beagle and I hope OpenSUSE will consider using it as default as opposed to Beagle, especially if that feature of opening each and every login continues.

Oh man, speaking of logins, if one logs in, one must inevitably log back out. Another bug that reared it ugly head in Beta 2 is the total lock up of the system when logging out KDE, gnome, or icewm. This happens if you choose log out or reboot. How annoying. I had to hit reset 3 times in researching SUSE Linux for this article. Fortunately I chose the reiser filesystem and haven't lost data or my install yet.

Also new are many more modules in yast. Many deal with more options for networking and more hardware configurations. I thought I'd test out installing and configuring Zen. It made it through the extensive install, however, all of yast crashed and burnt when it was time to do the configuring and finish the install.

So, all in all, I found that Beta 2 introduced several new bugs and a few new features. An old friend at Mandrake once told me that sometimes the more bugs you squash, the more you make. ...Meaning that sometimes you fix one bug and it introduces two more. He said that's why sometimes you have to choose to release even though you know there are some bugs as they might be preferrable to the ones you make when you fix the first ones.

Some highlights in the 6 mb ChangeLog include:

  • ifolder3:

    • changed prefix to /usr/lib/ifolder3 [#104474]
  • installation-images:
    • fixed /etc permissions (#104715)
  • nmap:
    • Don't strip binaries
  • yast2
    • Lots of typo fixes, and bug fixes
  • OpenOffice_org:
    • fixed some potentially dangerous warnings

    • fixed to build portaudio with RPM_OPT_FLAGS
    • updated branding for 10.0 [#102355]
  • hotplug:
    • removed also desktop templates

    • removed all files except hotplug.functions and desktop templates
      package will be dropped completely in next beta
  • hwinfo:
    • added hdtv cards (#102933)

    • find input device udi (#102575)
    • fixed usb device udi matching (#102575)
    • read modules.alias, not modules.pcimap
    • updated X11 data
  • initial:
    • minor string format changes to ease the translators' work

    • updated po/{de,fr}.po
    • added po/{cs,hu,nb,pa,pt}.po
  • installation-images:
    • added sfdisk
  • kernel-source:
    • update to 2.6.13-rc6-git7

    • config.conf: Enable Xen build.
    • series.conf: Re-activated ntfs-subfs
  • Lots and lots of application version updates
  • Way too much to list here

I've carved down the changelog to only include since the last beta release and posted it here.

I've posted the License.txt here, as some expressed interest in it. Glancing over it, I'm not sure it's exactly the same one as in the installer, but this is the readable version on the install isos.

I've posted a complete list of rpms included as tested here if you wanted to check on the progress of your favorite app.

I've posted some screenshots of some of the new features here.

For a more complete report of the goodies in SUSE Linux by OpenSUSE, consult my previous report.

re: better experience

Oh wonderful! Good news. Thanks for your input. Smile

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Tizen 3.0 and Home Spying Appliances

Vulkan FOSS Adoptions

  • SDL 2.0.6 released, introduces Vulkan support
    The cross-platform development library has seen the release of its latest version. Quite a few exciting changes this time around, including support for Vulkan and more types of gamepads. SDL [Official Site] is something that has been used in quite a diverse array of projects and plenty of game ports that have made their way to Linux have taken advantage of it. The latest release has its fair share of general improvements but most noticeable is the implementation of Vulkan support. This hopefully will make it easier for developers to take advantage of the Vulkan API and help it gain more traction.
  • X.Org Foundation Has Become A Khronos Adopter
    The X.Org Foundation board announced during this week's XDC2017 summit that they have officially completed the paperwork to become a Khronos adopter. The X.Org Foundation is now considered a pro-bono adopter for The Khronos Group so that the community-based open-source drivers targeting Khronos APIs for conformance can submit conformance test results and become a certified implementation.

Security: DHS on Potential Voting Machines Cracking, Joomla Patches Critical Flaw

  • DHS tells 21 states they were Russia hacking targets before 2016 election
  • 1. WikiLeaks, Russian edition: how it’s being viewed
    Russia has been investing heavily in a vision of cyberdemocracy that will link the public directly with government officials to increase official responsiveness. But it is also enforcing some of the toughest cybersecurity laws to empower law enforcement access to communications and ban technologies that could be used to evade surveillance. Could WikiLeaks put a check on Russia’s cyber regime? This week, the online activist group released the first of a promised series of document dumps on the nature and workings of Russia’s surveillance state. So far, the data has offered no bombshells. “It’s mostly technical stuff. It doesn’t contain any state contracts, or even a single mention of the FSB [security service], but there is some data here that’s worth publishing,” says Andrei Soldatov, coauthor of “The Red Web,” a history of the Soviet and Russian internet. But, he adds, “Anything that gets people talking about Russia's capabilities and actions in this area should be seen as a positive development.”
  • Joomla patches eight-year-old critical CMS bug
    Joomla has patched a critical bug which could be used to steal account information and fully compromise website domains. This week, the content management system (CMS) provider issued a security advisory detailing the flaw, which is found in the LDAP authentication plugin. Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) is used by Joomla to access directories over TCP/IP. The plugin is integrated with the CMS. Joomla considers the bug a "medium" severity issue, but according to researchers from RIPS Technologies, the problem is closer to a critical status.
  • Joomla! 3.7.5 - Takeover in 20 Seconds with LDAP Injection
    With over 84 million downloads, Joomla! is one of the most popular content management systems in the World Wide Web. It powers about 3.3% of all websites’ content and articles. Our code analysis solution RIPS detected a previously unknown LDAP injection vulnerability in the login controller. This one vulnerability could allow remote attackers to leak the super user password with blind injection techniques and to fully take over any Joomla! <= 3.7.5 installation within seconds that uses LDAP for authentication. Joomla! has fixed the vulnerability in the latest version 3.8.

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more