Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Apple vs. Microsoft vs. Linux: Good vs. Evil and Do You Really Care?

Filed under
OS

If you follow big companies closely, you will find they have moments where they do things that are amazing, and moments where you wonder what rock they crawled out from under.

Apple sucks at PR, but is blessed with one of the best marketing organizations on the planet and a group of fans that attack detractors like rabid dogs.

Microsoft has mixed PR (it uses three firms that are poorly coordinated). I sometimes wonder if it can spell “marketing,”and Microsoft has had the word “evil,” as in “evil empire,” associated with its name for nearly two decades. Yet it has nearly unmatched positional power in the tech industry.

Linux has no PR to speak of, and the marketing is almost non-existent (makes you wonder how all of us would stay in business if it was a Linux world – who pays for the ads?). It is championed by fans that have been known to be even more rabid than the Apple fan base, although they have slowed over the years.

More Here




Enderle Alert

Readers beware. That's the same guy who compares Linux users to zealots and 9/11 terrorists. He does business with Microsoft (among clients).

Right

Yeah, Enderle hates Linux and Linux users. I first encountered his ideas when reading about the SCO case at Groklaw. He purports to be an "industry analyst", whereas "microsoft shill" might be a more accurate designation.

If it didn't come from you

I almost would have believed it.

Really, Schestowitz deals in slander, paranoia and conspiracy theories without delivering the slightest proof - so better don't believe a word he says, it's probably pure character-assasination.

Oh, look, it's 'eet'

Hey 'eet',

Still staying out of my sites? No longer willing to compare us to Germany circa 1940? If you look around, you'll see that I'm passionately pro-Linux and I haven't affiliation with Linux companies or Microsoft.

One look at your blog

will remind everyone strongly of the National Enquirer. Minus the humanitarian stance and good journalism of course... Censoring critical comments and claiming that they all come from me is also quite revealing to your readers, I guess...

And yes, those tasteless graphics and constant trademark-misuse on your website, as well as your constant talk about 'impurity', 'infections', 'treason' and 'conspiracy', remind me very strongly not of Germany's 40s but of the election-campaigning style in Germany in the 20s and early 30s.

Roy, if you want your credibility back (in case you ever had any) start by not using stupid and aggressive propaganda imagery.

You could then slowly proceed to not accusing members of the GNOME board of being corrupt.

Until then, better keep your mouth shut.

Accusations?

Most accusations are just coming from you and they are mostly baseless. As for the imagery, it's there to express the truth in a quickly-digestible way because not everyone reads text carefully.

I'm done with this thread. Have fun.

"because not everyone reads text carefully"

Well, that would be fitting. Because neither do you _write_ your texts carefully. Sometimes you put out several blog-entries a day, cluttered with whatever odd quotes you've found while browsing the web at night. None of them researched in any way, and thus full of really embarrassing mistakes. You simply refuse to do any research. Because you don't want to _know_, you only want to slander.

Best example: You repeatedly insinuated Jeff Waugh and his wife to be corrupt. When Jeff confronted you, you rejected his kind offer to interview him in person, you didn't call him, even though he gave you his phone number - instead you you were all "oh now, that's a big misunderstanding, you read me wrong". But still you went on accusing him and now even the GNOME board of having been bought by Microsoft.

Only when you are confronted you virtually merge with the wall behind you, you utterly vanish. On a similar occasion, when Jeff invited you to publicly ask him questions in a podcast, you didn't dare pose a _single_ critical question when it came to it. Oh, I forgot, your excuse was that "you didn't prepare for the podcast". You never prepare, that's the impression one gets. Preparation is no fun, eh? And the minute you were back on your blog, after the production, you were whining 'oh, they were so many, they were all against me, it was a conspiracy; how could I possibly have asked questions in such a hostile atmosphere'. Oh, come ON!

You really enjoy writing baseless s**t in your blog, dripping with poison and mischief, and the moment it gets to a 'man to man' you soooo chicken out.

Roy, stop the backstabbing. If you're just not man enough to work diligently leave the GNOME community alone, and rather start working on your PhD.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Linux and Graphics

Security News

  • Hacking the American College Application Process
    In recent years, foreign students have streamed into American universities, their numbers nearly doubling in the last decade. About half of all international students are coming from Asian countries, many of which have been subject to heavy recruitment from American colleges. Taking advantage of the popularity of an American education, a new industry has sprung up in East Asia, focused on guiding students through the U.S. college application process with SAT preparation courses, English tutors and college essay advisors. But not all college prep companies are playing by the rules. In their investigative series for Reuters, a team of reporters found that foreign companies are increasingly helping students game the U.S. college application process. Some companies have leaked questions from college entrance exams to their students before they take the test. Others have gone so far as to ghostwrite entire college applications and complete coursework for students when they arrive on campus. We spoke with Steve Stecklow, one of the reporters on the team, about what they uncovered.
  • illusive networks' Deceptions Everywhere
    illusive networks' bread and butter is its deception cybersecurity technology called Deceptions Everywhere whose approach is to neutralize targeted attacks and Advanced Persistent Threats by creating a deceptive layer across the entire network. By providing an endless source of false information, illusive networks disrupts and detects attacks with real-time forensics and without disruption to business.
  • Mozila Offers Free Security Scanning Service: Observatory
    With an eye toward helpiing administrators protect their websites and user communities, Mozilla has developed an online scanner that can check if web servers have optimal security settings in place. It's called Observatory and was initially built for in-house use, but it may very well be a difference maker for you. "Observatory by Mozilla is a project designed to help developers, system administrators, and security professionals configure their sites safely and securely," the company reports.

Games for GNU/Linux

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Flatpak Universal Linux Package Supports Local Path References for Git Sources
    Alex Larsson from the Flatpak project has announced the release of a new maintenance update to the universal binary package format for Linux kernel-based operating systems. Flatpak 0.6.9 is now the latest version, and it promises to add many great enhancements, among which we can mention the ability to pass partial references every time a terminal command takes a runtime or application name, as well as a brand new command called build-commit-from. Application developers who want to package their apps and distribute it in the Flatpak format can use the above-mentioned command for creating new commits based on the contents of an existing commit, which can be from another local repository or a remote one.
  • Multiple vulnerabilities in RPM – and a rant
    Last year in November I decided that it might be a good idea to fuzz the parsers of package management tools in Linux distributions. I quickly found a couple of issues in DPKG and RPM. For DPKG the process went very smooth. I reported them to Debian's security team, eight days later fixes and security advisories were published by both Debian and Ubuntu, the main distributions using DPKG. For RPM the process was a bit more difficult.
  • Commvault announces support for Red Hat Virtualisation 4
    Back-up and archive specialist CommVault has announced support for Red Hat Virtualisation 4, the open source company's kernel-based virtual machine powered virtualisation platform. Red Hat Virtualisation 4 is built on the company's enterprise Linux distribution. It provides a centralised management platform for both Linux- and Windows-based workloads.
  • Zacks Assigns Rating To Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • GSoC Wrap Up
    GSoC 2016 finished last week and i am writing this blog to list the work done by me in last three months for Fedora. My project was to adjust pagure and write script(s) so that we can have pkgs.fedoraproject.org on a pagure instance.