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Apple vs. Microsoft vs. Linux: Good vs. Evil and Do You Really Care?

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If you follow big companies closely, you will find they have moments where they do things that are amazing, and moments where you wonder what rock they crawled out from under.

Apple sucks at PR, but is blessed with one of the best marketing organizations on the planet and a group of fans that attack detractors like rabid dogs.

Microsoft has mixed PR (it uses three firms that are poorly coordinated). I sometimes wonder if it can spell “marketing,”and Microsoft has had the word “evil,” as in “evil empire,” associated with its name for nearly two decades. Yet it has nearly unmatched positional power in the tech industry.

Linux has no PR to speak of, and the marketing is almost non-existent (makes you wonder how all of us would stay in business if it was a Linux world – who pays for the ads?). It is championed by fans that have been known to be even more rabid than the Apple fan base, although they have slowed over the years.

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Enderle Alert

Readers beware. That's the same guy who compares Linux users to zealots and 9/11 terrorists. He does business with Microsoft (among clients).

Right

Yeah, Enderle hates Linux and Linux users. I first encountered his ideas when reading about the SCO case at Groklaw. He purports to be an "industry analyst", whereas "microsoft shill" might be a more accurate designation.

If it didn't come from you

I almost would have believed it.

Really, Schestowitz deals in slander, paranoia and conspiracy theories without delivering the slightest proof - so better don't believe a word he says, it's probably pure character-assasination.

Oh, look, it's 'eet'

Hey 'eet',

Still staying out of my sites? No longer willing to compare us to Germany circa 1940? If you look around, you'll see that I'm passionately pro-Linux and I haven't affiliation with Linux companies or Microsoft.

One look at your blog

will remind everyone strongly of the National Enquirer. Minus the humanitarian stance and good journalism of course... Censoring critical comments and claiming that they all come from me is also quite revealing to your readers, I guess...

And yes, those tasteless graphics and constant trademark-misuse on your website, as well as your constant talk about 'impurity', 'infections', 'treason' and 'conspiracy', remind me very strongly not of Germany's 40s but of the election-campaigning style in Germany in the 20s and early 30s.

Roy, if you want your credibility back (in case you ever had any) start by not using stupid and aggressive propaganda imagery.

You could then slowly proceed to not accusing members of the GNOME board of being corrupt.

Until then, better keep your mouth shut.

Accusations?

Most accusations are just coming from you and they are mostly baseless. As for the imagery, it's there to express the truth in a quickly-digestible way because not everyone reads text carefully.

I'm done with this thread. Have fun.

"because not everyone reads text carefully"

Well, that would be fitting. Because neither do you _write_ your texts carefully. Sometimes you put out several blog-entries a day, cluttered with whatever odd quotes you've found while browsing the web at night. None of them researched in any way, and thus full of really embarrassing mistakes. You simply refuse to do any research. Because you don't want to _know_, you only want to slander.

Best example: You repeatedly insinuated Jeff Waugh and his wife to be corrupt. When Jeff confronted you, you rejected his kind offer to interview him in person, you didn't call him, even though he gave you his phone number - instead you you were all "oh now, that's a big misunderstanding, you read me wrong". But still you went on accusing him and now even the GNOME board of having been bought by Microsoft.

Only when you are confronted you virtually merge with the wall behind you, you utterly vanish. On a similar occasion, when Jeff invited you to publicly ask him questions in a podcast, you didn't dare pose a _single_ critical question when it came to it. Oh, I forgot, your excuse was that "you didn't prepare for the podcast". You never prepare, that's the impression one gets. Preparation is no fun, eh? And the minute you were back on your blog, after the production, you were whining 'oh, they were so many, they were all against me, it was a conspiracy; how could I possibly have asked questions in such a hostile atmosphere'. Oh, come ON!

You really enjoy writing baseless s**t in your blog, dripping with poison and mischief, and the moment it gets to a 'man to man' you soooo chicken out.

Roy, stop the backstabbing. If you're just not man enough to work diligently leave the GNOME community alone, and rather start working on your PhD.

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