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Ubuntu — Beyond the Hype

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Ubuntu

Since a few years, Ubuntu has been grabbing headlines in the mainstream press, sometimes to the point where people are referring to Ubuntu where they mean Linux (or GNU/Linux as the case may be)...

In short, we've seen and read the hype.

This is not the first time I had a look at Ubuntu, not at all. The first time I tried it, which must be about 3 years ago now, I was curious to see if it was really that much better than other distributions I have experience with. Linux for Human beings, it was said. Talk is cheap, is also said. And alas, I found that to be true.

Whether it's better than other distributions in a straight comparison is something for another review (sometime soon if I can help it), but that's not, nor has it ever been, the point I'll be making. But whether it's functional, usable, yes even pleasant to use, that's the thing. Hint nr. 1: I'm using it right now, and I have for a few weeks now. Want to know more? Read on!

More Here




Overdose of questions? Should I answer?

Naturally, this review can be classified as one man's experience.

Only a small part of it is opinion, most is a relaying of things how they happened.

The review is indeed based on experiences with a single machine, but note: the machine in question is a Novell certified machine with an excellent track record in terms of Linux compatibility. Note further that this review is about the way Ubuntu behaves, and since very few sections in the review are related to (negative Ubuntu experience with) this particular laptop, the review is relevant to all with an interest in Ubuntu. The one hardware issue is with the choice of Ubuntu developers to go for the new libata driver which clashes with the optical drive. Since this issue pops up with all drives from TSST made during a certain period, and TSST has had 20% marketshare for quite a few years, this issue too is considered relevant for a wide audience.

There is no comparison to UNIX training in the past, there is some comparison to other Linux and UNIX systems which are all very much alive today. I have no idea what this phrase means:

Quote:
not technically oriented to discuss the Ubuntu architecture and limited contents.
so I can't comment on that.

To this:

Quote:
Ubuntu and its family are each an embedded system with different desktops, but same web browser.

I can only say: I have not yet seen, heard or read about an embedded Ubuntu system - all Ubuntu family members install on regular PC hardware, and this is certainly the case for the Ubuntu siblings in this review, and they are thus by definition not embedded.

Quote:
Ubuntu being an embedded solution of a midi size, can only be compared with midi Linux systems.

Meaning: it shouldn't be compared to mainframe systems or so? Since the only system mentioned that doesn't run on straight x86 hardware is HP-UX, I think I stayed within these limits.
Otherwise, Ubuntu is Linux, it's not embedded, and it can be compared to any Linux or Unix system, including Mac for instance - to which I couldn't compare it for lack of Mac OS X experience.

Quote:
It is no longer i386 but i686 platform in the latest few releases. 64 bit version is appended two 32 bit cores.

Where shall I start? The review is about the x86-64 version, also called AMD64, and it will run on AMD64 CPUs from AMD and on Intel EM64T CPUs. Both architectures are backwards compatible with IA32 / x86 32 bit code, but the reviewed Ubuntu system is compiled for AMD64.
A 64 bit version is certainly not two 32 bit cores appended to each other. First, there are plenty of 32 bit dual core CPUs on the market, and second, there are single core 64 bit AMD64 CPUs available as well.

Quote:
Most important detail of the minimum requirement of dram size for any Ubuntu is not mentioned.

I have no idea to whom this may be of special interest, because people with such a low amount of RAM (256 MB or less) are already using Linux and know what's what. All others have upgraded by either adding memory or buying a new machine. No one in their right mind is running WinXP on such machines, and with the current cost of memory, nor should anyone who uses Linux.
Aside that, the kernel and some DE/WM will take similar amounts of memory, no matter which distribution. Hence, most distributions will run more or less with 128 to 256 MB of RAM. Getting OpenOffice.org writer to work simultaneously with Firefox or Konqueror with several tabs open, including my latest reviews, may prove a challenge in swapping though...

In case you hadn't guessed:
from the author.

With kind regard,
aRTee

PS Sorry to be pedantic, I guess I'm in the mood to take things personal...

Re: Overdose of questions? Should I answer?

aRTee,

You've been subjected to "atang1-land", where ordinary computer science related words, like "embedded", may take on mysterious meanings in atang1's mind--which often are incomprehensible to mere mortals. Sometimes I can figure out what atang1 is trying to say, most times I can't. Sometimes I learn something from an atang1 post--many times I give up in frustration as there are too many non-sequiturs and off-center meanings to discern his message.

Personally, I thought your Ubuntu review was detailed, informative, and well done.

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