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Linux on the Dell Inspiron 1520

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Linux

Of all people, after having installed and used 40+ Linux distributions, I should know which distribution I want to put on my new computer. I didn't. I knew the general direction I wanted to go, I just wasn't sure exactly which path. Ubuntu is fairly popular and well-supported on Dell hardware (otherwise they wouldn't sell it). However one of my main uses for my laptop aside from Java programming is to kill time, which means games.

Thanks to some helpful folks at LinuxForums and some searching on my own, I've found quite a few free and not free games I can play on the new Linux system. The question I had at this point was this: do I want to install the base system and then install the games manually, or use a distribution that has these games out of the box? Sabayon in particular has impressed me with their game selection. However it is based on Gentoo, which is not as popular with packagers.

Also, since the new laptop was a Core 2, I also had to contend with whether or not I wanted a 64-bit version of Linux. There were lots of things to consider. I ended up trying out Ubuntu 7.10 (32 and 64-bit) and Sabayon 3.4f (32-bit).

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