Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Firefox 3 Beta 2 First Impressions

Filed under

I would hope many of our regular readers are aware that the TrustedReviews staff are avid fans of the Firefox web browser. Ever since the beta releases of the first version started to become available back in 2004 we've been fans of its ease of use and versatility, and we've been using it ever since. However, when Microsoft released the latest version of its Internet Explorer browser, IE7, last year, arguably the single biggest selling point of Firefox was wiped out in one fell swoop.

You see, while the popularity of Firefox is due to a number of elements, including its vast array of add-ons that enable you to perform almost whatever task you can imagine, and its open source development, the predominant reason it grabbed so many people's attention was its tabbed browsing. Ok, it wasn't actually the first to market with tabbed browsing - that honour goes to Opera - but many people had been put off by Opera simply because you had to pay for it, even though that was no longer the case.

However, just in the nick of time the Mozilla Foundation has pulled its finger out and released beta versions of Firefox 3, with a view to officially unveiling its latest and greatest in the next few months. So, with beta version 2 now available for Mac and PC, I thought I'd take you on a trip round what in my opinion is going to be the best browser available in the foreseeable future.

More Here

More in Tux Machines

Turris Omnia Is a Linux-Based Powerful Open Source Router That Updates on the Fly

Turris Omnia is a new open source router that comes with powerful hardware and a Linux distro based on OpenWRT. It’s a smashing hit on Indiegogo, and there is still time to get one. Read more

APT (Advanced Package Tool) 1.1 Is Now Stable in Debian

APT (Advanced Package Tool) is a famous set of core tools inside Debian that make it possible to install, remove, and keep applications up to date. The stable branch of APT has been finally upgraded with the version 1.3. Read more

Historians and detectives keep track of data with open source tool

Segrada is a piece of open source software that allows historians (and detectives) to keep track of their data. Unlike wikis or archival databases, its focus lies on information and interrelations within it. Pieces of information might represent persons, places, things, or concepts. These "nodes" can be bidirectionally connected with each other to semantically represent friendship, blood relation, whereabouts, authorship, and so on. Hence the term "semantic graph database," since information can be displayed as a graph of semantically connected nodes. Read more

today's leftovers