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Enlightenment E17 - A Detailed Look

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My first Linux experiences came through Knoppix and Mandrake, which send you to the KDE desktop by default. I used KDE at first, but I wanted to experiment with other less Windowsesque environments. The first one I installed was Enlightenment 16, which I must confess I had first heard of in Neal Stephenson's essay "In The Beginning There Was the Command Line.” In that essay he said Enlightenment "may be the hippest single technology product I have ever seen" and that "it looks amazingly cool." Since these sentiments were written in 1999, plenty of rivals have emerged for the title of “hippest tech.”

Once I had Enlightenment installed on my laptop there was no going back. I tried out a few other window managers, but the efficiency of E16 was hard to beat. My only complaints were that Enlightenment seemed a bit short on conveniences such as launchers, so I ended up running GNOME stripped down to one panel and the main menu with E16 as the window manager. Meanwhile, I read the descriptions of the new "desktop shell" that the Enlightenment crew was working on, dubbed Enlightenment DR17 (or E17, as I'll refer to it from here on) and thought it sounded like exactly what I wanted.

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