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Give Wine apps the look and feel of GNOME or KDE

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Software

Wine allows users to run Windows programs natively under Linux without paying a dime. However, there's a tiny problem: programs running in Wine don't look so great. They don't even try to fit into your native GNOME or KDE color scheme or use your preferred fonts. You could use a Windows theme, but themes make Wine run extremely slowly. Luckily, with a little configuration editing, it's easy to make Wine applications look at lot more like the rest of the apps on your desktop.

Integrating into GNOME

To integrate Wine applications with a GNOME desktop, first run the winecfg utility and switch to the Desktop Integration tab. Separately, open the GNOME Appearance program under System -> Preferences, click the Customize button, and click on the Colors tab, then click on an element (e.g. Windows) to pop up GNOME's color picker. Switch back to winecfg and click an appropriate item (e.g. Active Title Bar). Click the Color next to it to open up another color picker, and click the Add to Custom Colors button. Finally, copy and paste the RGB values from the GNOME color picker into the corresponding values in the winecfg color picker.

GNOME and Wine sometimes use different terminology to refer to the same items:

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