Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

AMD asks Intel for a dual-core duel

Filed under
Hardware

Advanced Micro Devices has challenged Intel to a public fight to see which company has the best-performing 64-bit dual-core server processors.

The company placed advertisements in major U.S. newspapers Tuesday proposing a contest that would pit the fastest server based on a dual-core AMD processor with the fastest server based on an equivalent chip from Intel, AMD said.

It's the second time this year that AMD has taken its rivalry with Intel to the press. In June it took out full-page newspaper advertisements urging people to read its antitrust complaint against the chip maker.

The advertisements in Tuesday's Wall Street Journal, USA Today and other newspapers show an AMD processor standing in a boxing ring waiting for Intel to appear, AMD said. If Intel accepts, the contest will be overseen by a third-party testing lab using standard benchmarks measuring performance and energy consumption.

Some analysts dismiss performance benchmarks as a distraction since they rarely reflect real-world computing conditions. But vendors often cite them to show the performance of their chips. AMD said a head-to-head fight would allow customers to decide which company's processors best suit their needs. It will also launch an online petition, it said, presumably to pressure Intel to take part.

Intel, in Santa Clara, California, could not be reached for comment early Tuesday.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Tiny, stackable, Linux-based IoT module hits Kickstarter

On Kickstarter, Onion launched a tiny, Linux-based “Omega” IoT module, along with a dock, stackable expansion modules, a cloud service, and web app tools. Onion’s Omega joins a growing number of single board computers and computer-on-modules for Internet of Things applications that have tapped Qualcomm’s MIPS-based, WiFi-enabled Atheros AR9331 system-on-chip. For a pledge of $25, Onion’s Kickstarter campaign offers the Omega computer-on-module combined with a “dock” that turns it into an sandwich-style single board computer. Read more

Development activity in LibreOffice and OpenOffice

The LibreOffice project was announced with great fanfare in September 2010. Nearly one year later, the OpenOffice.org project (from which LibreOffice was forked) was cut loose from Oracle and found a new home as an Apache project. It is fair to say that the rivalry between the two projects in the time since then has been strong. Predictions that one project or the other would fail have not been borne out, but that does not mean that the two projects are equally successful. A look at the two projects' development communities reveals some interesting differences. Read more

11 Ways That Linux Contributes to Tech Innovation

Over the past six months I've asked new Linux Foundation corporate members on the cutting edge of technology to weigh in on what interesting or innovative trends they're witnessing and the role that Linux plays in them. Here's what engineers, CTOs, and other business leaders from companies including CoreOS, Rackspace, SanDisk, and more had to say. Read more