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Mandriva 2006 Beta 3

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How's the development of Mandriva 2006 progressing? Well, there wasn't a lot new to the naked eye except for the replacement of the nice wallpaper seen in the last beta. Now we are subjected to one with the big word "Free" across it. And I didn't save the old install either.

One new big development I noticed was the replacement of xorg 6.8.2 with the 6.9 version from cvs. I was hoping my nvidia card would now be supported in xorg's nv, but to my disappointment it isn't. However the newest nvidia drivers build fine on Mandriva once the kernel-sources are installed.

    

Another little change is the placement of a kopete icon in the quick launcher. As Mandriva gives me the impression of slowly moving away from some kde apps, this offers hope that perhaps I'm reading more into the Firefox being the default browser. I'll ignore the fact that clicking on a text file brings up gedit.

    

Oh, speaking of gtk, where is gnome? The installer had it selected. Urpmi says it's installed. However the option is missing from the kdm login screen and I spent quite a while trying to find the binary to start it manually. It's MIA folks, if I'm not mistaken. Urpmi doesn't find a gdm to install either. I guess this is one of those little glitches Mandrake was famous for, and that will be fixed next release.

Well, sorry so short, but most of the improvements must have been under the hood. The changelog claims some 250 bugs have been fixed and 5600 packages have been rebuilt. Highlights include:

  • xorg-x11-6.9-0.cvs20050810.6mdk

  • kernel 2.6.12-10mdk
    • Updated ipw2100 to 1.1.2, ipw2200 to 1.0.6

    • Ndiswrapper 1.2
    • added XEN support
  • GTK 2.8.0
  • gaim 1.5.0
  • sane 1.0.16
  • epiphany 1.6.5
  • kat 0.6.2
  • amarok 1.3
  • udev 068
  • gnome-desktop-2.10.2-1mdk <shrugs>
  • kdebase-3.4.2-21mdk
  • gcc-4.0.1-2mdk
  • glibc-2.3.5-4mdk
  • libqt3-3.3.4-19mdk
  • mozilla-firefox-1.0.6-7mdk

Full rpm list as tested here. Not too many new screenshots this time other than what you see here, as not much new to the eye. You may peruse the Beta 2 Screenshots here. That Beta 2 report is here.

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