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Linux on a Fast-Food Diet

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Linux

Instead of the traditional car analogy, how about a restaurant analogy?

Consider McDonald's.

At one end, you have yourself. You go to the market and get the basic ingredients, mix them yourself, cook them yourself in your own oven, and eat them yourself. This is equivalent to downloading an Open/Free distribution and sorting out what you want and making it work the way you want. Most of you have done this (I'm not counting desktops, yet).

At the other end, you have the five-star restaurant. Everything is handled for you, for a price. This is the equivalent of deploying Oracle or such. A few of you have done this.

But what about the middle? Where's the "McDonald's" model? By that, I mean a limited selection prepared in a limited number of variations but delivered to you quickly and inexpensively. Sure, a meal at McDonald's might not cost a tenth as much as a meal at a five-star restaurant, but McDonald's (the corporation) makes billions of dollars a year, and they're everywhere.

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