Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Red Hat and Firefox more buggy than Microsoft?

Filed under
Security

Secunia has found that the number of security bugs in the open source Red Hat Linux operating system and Firefox browsers far outstripped comparable products from Microsoft last year.

Out of the operating systems monitored by Secunia - Windows (98 and onwards), Mac OS X, HP-UX 10.x and 11.x, Solaris 8, 9, and 10 and Red Hat (excluding Fedora) - Red Hat was found to have by far the most vulnerabilities, at 633, with 99 percent found in third-party components. (Linux distributions are generally composed mostly of third-party software, which is integrated by the distributor.)

Red Hat has taken issue with the figures, claiming the accurate number should be 404 vulnerabilities for last year.

Windows had only 123 bugs reported, but 96 percent of those were found in the operating system itself.

More Here




Red Hat bugs - another open source PR hit?

Red Hat and Firefox are reported to have more bugs in them than their Microsoft equivalents. But the truth is, as always, more complex. And once again, security is shown as a key point where rival approaches are bidding to distinguish themselves.

Secunia reported the discrpancy, stating in its 2007 Report that Red Hat had 633 flaws, compared with Windows' 123. However, Red Hat's Mark Cox quickly pointed out in a blog that a) the number was wrong, Cool it counted flaws in all the third party products associated with Red Hat's OS, and worst of all c) it counted several bugs six times, since it added up fixes made for the same bug, on multiple Red Hat products.

The interesting thing is why Secunia would push this story at all.

More Here

Firefox is fixed faster

Counting security vulnerabilities to compare the security of different software projects is flawed. It is only a useful metric if you are comparing a project to itself over time. I’ve discussed this topic here and here. It’s even more ridiculous to try and compare an open source bug count to a closed source project because you can see all the bugs in an open source project. You can only see the publicly found security issues for a closed source product, like Internet Explorer.

So what is interesting in the Techworld article is the measures of real risk to users:

More Here

Good additions there

When I saw the headline I was going to post these rebuttal articles too, but you beat me to it. Nice review of MEPIS BTW...

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2015.02 Distro Brings a Unique, Pure KDE Plasma 5 Experience - Screenshot Tour

The KaOS development team was proud to announce on February 24 the immediate availability for download of the KaOS 2015.02 Linux kernel-based operating system for personal computers and laptops. This is the first ever release of the KaOS Linux distribution with the next-generation KDE Plasma desktop environment, powered by the latest KDE Frameworks 5 technology. Read more

Snowden's favourite Linux - Tails - rushes sec-fix version to market

The developers want to kill off the previous version, Tails 1.2.3, as soon as possible, with a list of 14 security issues covering everything from the Tor browser and its network security services (NSS) through to a sudo privilege escalation bug. Read more

5 specialized Linux distributions for computer repair

Computers are incredible tools that let users doing amazing things, but sometimes things go wrong. The problem could be as small as accidentally deleting files or forgetting a password—and as major as having an operating system rendered non-bootable by file system corruption. Or, worst case scenario, a hard drive dying completely. In each of these cases, and many more like them, there are specialized tools that can aid you in fixing problems with a computer or help you be prepared for when something bad does happen. Read more

How To Install League Of Legends Game On Linux

League of Legends (LoL) is a 2009 multiplayer online battle arena video game developed and published by Riot Games for Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X. It is a free-to-play game that is supported by micro-transactions and inspired by the mod Defense of the Ancients for the video game Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne.

 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu