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Open source shields BitTorrent from legal attacks

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"The fact that Bram Cohen decided to make BitTorrent open source may be the biggest reason why the Motion Pictures Association of America (MPAA) has not gone after it. If you read headlines all over the Internet you see that the MPAA launched a pretty heavy assault on some of the biggest BitTorrent sites like LokiTorrent but don't be confused, BitTorrent as a technology or Bram Cohen its author has not come to any harm legally. Also BitTorrent is often viewed as its own P2P network, which it is not."

"Because BitTorrent is open source and so many new clients have been developed by its users, there basically is no company for the RIAA/MPAA to go after, besides the sites. Another big point for BitTorrent is its massive amount of legitimate uses. "If someone wants to distribute their own material and it's a lot of bits, the simplest way to do it is BitTorrent," Albert said. "There's a lot of legitimate uses for BitTorrent outside of the entertainment industry. My gut reaction [to BitTorrent] is, maybe you could use that for illegal movie and music swapping, but its primary purpose is to distribute material legitimately.""

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Updated version of BitTorrent released March 7.

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